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lgnz18

15 - 17 July 2018, Christ's College, Christchurch

Te Maire Tau

Te Maire is the director of the Ngai Tahu Research Centre at the University of Canterbury. He took up this position in 2011, having previously been a Senior Lecturer in History at the University. Te Maire belongs to Ngai Tahu, the principal tribe of the South Island, and lives in Tuahiwi, the largest village of that tribe. During his years as an undergraduate and later as a postgraduate student at Canterbury, Te Maire helped iwi leaders with their land claim to the Waitangi Tribunal, with a particular emphasis on traditional food-gathering practices. As a specialist historian on oral traditions, tribal genealogies and indigenous knowledge systems, Te Maire was used as an expert witness and historian for the settlement of the Ngai Tahu Claim - the largest settlement in its day between Maori and the Crown for lands wrongfully taken. Since then he has had a number of publications dealing with oral traditions and the relationship between indigenous knowledge systems and how they intersect with western science. Te Maire's research interests include the philosophy of knowledge, oral traditions, myth, indigenous development and history.

Inspiring Maori connections to grow thriving, prosperous communities

How to interact and engage appropriately with Maori as a strategic partner.

As the Treaty settlement process between the Crown and Maori moves forward, this Maori perspective will consider the possible future role of iwi in local governance.

Councils will gain an appreciation of what for Maori 'tino-rangatiratanga' might mean for the local government sector and how they might interact and engage appropriately with Maori as a strategic partner.

This presentation will outline what tribal government means at a local government level.  The presenter will describe 'tino-rangatiratanga' as imagined by Maori when they signed the Treaty of Waitangi and how that concept has relevance for Maori today particularly as assets are returned to iwi from Treaty settlements.  The presenter will describe how co-governance models might evolve and how Maori might grow their role and position in their own and their region's economy.

 

The presenter will provide a challenging perspective on how the Treaty settlement process might affect local governance and local democracy.  It will help councils to understand iwi's perspective on these large and evolving issues so that they are able to better debate these issues with their communities.


 

 

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